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Distance versus Accuracy

If you have been to a driving range lately you will notice a queue of people waiting for a tee and with most people spending far too much time on the driver and less time on the irons. I always find this ironic considering the driver is the club least used in a round of golf. With that in mind I wanted to share my thoughts on why focusing on accuracy is far more important than how far you hit the ball off the tee. If you are a weekend golfer and hitting in the range of 90-100+ I would imagine the bulk of shots come from within 150 yards of the tee (approach irons, chipping and putting). As we all know a tee shot in the fairway regardless of distance is almost always going to result in a better result. So what I do when I head out to the driving range is I start with the short wedges and aim for a close flag that is as straight as possible from my tee box. I will spend 5-10 shots on each club, gradually working up through my irons and fairway woods, finishing with the driver. On average with a bucket of 100 balls I may only swing the driver 4-5 times.



From there I will usually move to the chipping area (if available). Here my main focus is keeping my head down, lead wrist flat and smooth melodic swing tempo.


Finally, I head to the putting green where I will spend 15-30 mins putting shots within 20 feet of the hole. The reason being is that even if you have a long put in a round (25+ft) you are more likely to have a second shot and that is where you want to build your consistency and accuracy.


Once I step into the first tee box and have gone through my routine, I will have worked on all aspects of my game targeting a more accurate golf shot and ball striking and less about distance.


What is your routine?


Happy Golfing

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